Thrybergh Ravenfield Dalton

South Yorkshire England

            Pronounced locally Thrybur  Old English Triberg

Webmaster John Doxey

Main Photos Jonathan Dabbs

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ST GERARD'S SCHOOL pg 6

Park Nook,Thrybergh
Mixed   Infant and Junior


I would like to say welcome to the children and Staff of the School who are using the site to research the history of Thrybergh. Please consider this your page, contact me should you have any questions, or would like to add information on this page.

Please note this is not an official School site, anyone wishing to contact the School should do so via the School contact  information

 

 

 

INSPECTIONS AND PUNISHMENTS

 

All schools in England receive regular inspections to ensure that the current standards are being met by the school. Today those standards are somewhat higher and rather more complex than those fifty years ago. A recent Government inspection rated St. Gerard's as above national average in education, which is a great indication of how the School and its pupils have improved from the early days.


 In the last century we have to be honest most of us as kids were any Teachers nightmare, corporal punishment was allowed back then but even that did not prevent most pupils from getting into trouble, at some stage of school life you would get into trouble and receive the cane. Today that practice has gone. No not the practice of getting into trouble, just the old cane.


Below you will find two records of corporal punishment carried out at St. Gerard's one is an extract of individuals who received the cane, and the other a list of Teachers allowed to administer the punishment. Now in general the Teachers were not monsters of cruelty, caning was at that time an accepted and expected punishment for us wrongdoers. There were instances of Teachers in the many Schools in the land who were quite sadistic when it came to administering corporal punishment.
The people named as receiving the cane were not particularly little villains, they were just unfortunately caught in the act.
As can be seen below  the most strokes of the cane were received for swearing at a girl, which was considered worse than stealing apples !


I read this list and chuckled as I knew one or two of the individuals on the list, and also remembered the occasions when I received the cane, and remembering back then getting into bother was all part of growing up. I remember on one occasion the whole of my class of 36 pupils was caned for pouring milk into a teachers Wellington boots [ Gumboots ] The boots were white inside so the milk was not seen, It was the middle of winter and snow was on the ground, so no I don't blame the teacher for caning us that day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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STATEMENT :

I have no affiliation  with any Trade Union, Political body, or organization regarding the information on this site. All information on this site is Factual and correct to the extent of my knowledge. There is no intent to cause offence to any individual. Should you spot an error please let me know  and that error will be corrected.

PEASE NOTE:

This site is the result of over 7 years research, and compilation, should you wish to use any of the content for publication of literature please contact me. The poetry and life of James Ross, the story of St. Leonard's Cross, and other items on this site were compiled, and first published on this site in their present context as a study of Thrybergh. If you use this site as a source, out of courtesy, please give credit where it is due as I have done on this site where appropriate.
All text and pages as formatted and presented on this site Copyright John Doxey and may not be reproduced under any circumstances without consent. Photos, and information Copyright to Primary Sources where applicable