Thrybergh Ravenfield Dalton

South Yorkshire England

            Pronounced locally Thrybur  Old English Triberg

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NOBLE FAMILIES OF THRYBERGH

 

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The Neville's

 

Rozelline who held Thrybergh from William De Perci had a Co-heir whose name was  Baron Adam Swain who was the son of the founder of the priory of Monkbretton.  This Adam Swain had daughters and the eldest daughter and co-heir married a certain Alexandra Crevequer, so the  lordship of Thrybergh still under De Percy eventually passed to her descendants who were the the Nevils and the Hetons, one of the latter in the reign of Edward 111.

However elsewhere it states.

1166 William De Neville whose Knight fee's consisted of Manors of Thrybergh, Brinsworth, Dalton, and Bolton on Dearne the first three being held previously by Rozelline

William De Neville was born approx 1123, in Lincolnshire, England son of Gilbert De Neville Knight
William married Amabell De Fitz Swain  approx 1127 daughter of Adam De Fitz Swain and Matilda ? approx 1148, at Gawthorne, Yorkshire, England Amabel was the widow of  Alexander De Crevequer!

Now so far it seems the William and Amabel only had one daughter. who was Sara born c 1149 at Skirwith, Cumberlandshire, England now she seems to have married twice. Firstly to a Simon De Fitzwalter c. 1201 at Skirwith, then secondly to a Thomas De Borough with whom she had a son Phillip De Borough.

 

Shepley was held by the Burgh family. If the township was subinfeudated before 1166 it would then have been held by William de Neville husband of Amabel daughter of Adam son of Sveinn.

 

 

Also prior to 1160 a Adam Fitz Swien is recorded as a tenant of property at nearby Wentworth, with a daughter named Amabel.

 

Daughter of Adam who was Amabel married to De Neville Family.

Now discrepancies occur into who married who by varying resources:

1159, for example, Adam, son of Sveinn, son of Alric died, leaving as his heirs his two daughters, Amabel and Maude, who had married  William de Neville and Adam de Montbegan.

 

Walter de Neville Married: Cecilia De CREVEQUER (dau. of Alexander De Crevequer and Amabell De Fitzwaine) ABT 1155, Kingswalden, Hertfordshire, England

 

The Neville family appear in the Doomsday Book approx 73 times and are found as follows:

Witham on the Hill hundred, Lincolnshire Great Domesday Book Ralph de Neville;
Winteringham Hundred, Lincolnshire  Great Domesday Book Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Thealby Hundred, Lincolnshire  Great Domesday Book Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Skillington, Lincolnshire  Great Domesday Book Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Scotton, Lincolnshire Great Domesday Book Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Scotter, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Scopwick, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Riding, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Potterhanworth, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Northorpe near Kirton In Lindsey Hundred, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
South Rauceby Hundred, North Rauceby Hundred, Lincolnshire Ralph de Neville; Swein
Normanby, Lincolnshire  Ralph de Neville; Swein
Ness Wapentake, Lincolnshire Ralph de Neville; Swein
Navenby, Lincolnshire Ralph de Neville; Swein
Muskham, North Nottinghamshire, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Little Bytham Hundred, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Lenton, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein
Laughton near Blyton, Lincolnshire, Lincolnshire Arnketil Ralph de Neville; Swein

The so forth
Kirton in Lindsey, Lincolnshire,  Kirkby Green, Lincolnshire,  Irnham, Lincolnshire, Haxey, Lincolnshire, Hardwick, Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire Edenham, Lincolnshire, Deeping, Deeping St James and Market Deeping, Lincolnshire
Castle Bytham, Lincolnshire, Casewick, Lincolnshire, Burton-le-Coggles Hundred, Lincolnshire
Belton near Epworth, Lincolnshire, Barholm, Lincolnshire, Aslackby, Lincolnshire, Amcotts, Lincolnshire
Belmesthorpe, Lincolnshire
 

Whereas a Richard de Neville is found in Devon.
Woolleigh , Beaford, Devon Richard de Neville;
Wembworthy, Devon Richard de Neville;
North Tawton, Devon Richard de Neville;
Shirwell, Devon Richard de Neville;

From the above list you will note that I have included the names of Arnketil and Swein, I suspect that  Arnketil is the brother of  Northmann who held Thrybergh prior to the conquest, and the family of Swein is tied with the Neville family as you will see below.


 

From  Patronymica Britannica, a dictionary of the family names of the United Kingdom - Page 335
by Mark Antony Lower - 1860

 

1 SWAIN. The A-Sax. ttran, a pastoral servant, and the Scand. Streya, a proper name originally of the same import, have impressed themselves upon many localities, which in their turn have given designations to families. Among those which do not occur in gazetteers arn Swainston, Swainsland (now Sways- land), Swanston, and others. SWAINE. SWAYNE. }. A Scandinavian personal name of great antiquity, introduced here under the Danish rule. Domesday shows us several persons (tenants in chief and otherwise) called Svain, Suain, Suanus, Suuen, Swen or Sueno, some of whom are specifically stated to have held lands under Edward the Confessor. Suain of Essex, supposed by Morant to have been of Danish origin, was ancestor of the famous Henry de Essex, temp. Henry II. 2. The A-Sax. swan : see previous article. The forms in the Rotuli Hundredorum are Le Swein, Le Sweyn, and Sweyn. SWAINSON. See under Swaine. Tho name of Swcynson has existed for ages in Denmark. In the XI. and XII. centuries we find it here in the forms of Filius Suani and Fitz-Swain. In Domesday the wife of Edw. filius Suani was a chief-tenant in Essex. The well-known ascendancy of the Danes in Yorkshire from the time of Etbelred, A.D. 808, downwards, accounts for that district being the principal habitat of the name. The Swaynsons were located at Briggeholme, in the parish of Giggleswick, early in the XII. century, and they remained in that district until the middle of the XVIII. Early in the XII. century Adam Fitz-Swain or Swainson, was lord of  Hornby Castle. " You have the advantage (says the Rev. Jos. Hunter, addressing one of the family,) of having had a line of ancestors living in a good position in the county where Sweyn, the son of Alaric, and Adam, the son of Sweyn, had such large possessions." Beatson's Polit. Index. I. 4. Inf. Eev. Edw. C. Swayneon, H.A., the existing representative of the family.


Memorials of the Abbey of St. Mary of Fountains. - Page 57
by John Richard Walbran, Joseph Thomas Fowler, James Raine - 1863

"It is remarkable that neither of these  grants took permanent effect ; but as the lands are not again mentioned in any of the records of the house, I have not ascertained when or why they were surrendered. Certain, however, it is that when this Adam Fitz-Swain—who was a person of much consequence in South Yorkshire, who died about the year 1158—founded the Cluniac Priory of Monk-Bretton near Barnsley, he endowed it, among other possessions, with his lands at Ncwhala and Rainesberg ; places still to be identified in the parish of Wath-upon-Deame.— (Moa. Any., v. i., p. Ct!0 : Hunter'i South "
 


Page 245 “After the early twelfth century, the most frequent cause for the partitioning of estates was through inheritance by heiresses. In 1159, for example, Adam, son of Sveinn, son of Alric died, leaving as his heirs his two daughters, Amabel and Maude, whose respective husbands, William de Neville and Adam de Montbegan, inherited the eight knights’ fees he had held in the honour of Pontefract as well as the knights’ fee he held in the honour of Skipton  and probably another fee in the manor of Wakefield”  ??


WALTON originally was included in the honour of Ponte- fract, which belonged to Aluric, the son of Richard Ashen- hold, a noble Saxon thane, temp. ST. EDWARD THE CONFESSOR. He was  by his son Suein, who lost his estates at the Norman CONQUEST. By WILLIAM they were assigned to Ilbert de Laci, who gave back a great part of them in fee to Suein. He had a son, Adam, who founded the monastery of Monk Bretton. Adam, the son of Suein, had two dans, and co-heiresses, between whom his large estates were divided. Amabil was m. to William de Nevill. They had a dau. aud heiress, Sara, who became the wife of Thomas de Burgh.
 

Early Yorkshire Charters: Being a Collection of Documents Anterior to the ... - Page 183
by Charles Travies Clay, William Farrer - 1949
Walton in Sandal Magna, in a charter by which William de Neville and Amabel his wife confirmed to Uctred son of Ravenchil 91/2 bovates there to hold by knight service as Adam son of Swain had given to them.
 


The Pipe-rolls, Or Sheriff's Annual Accounts of the Revenues of the Crown ... - Page lxx
by John Hodgson-Hinde, William Dickson - 1847

.Culgarth was granted to Adam Fitz-Sueine, and is classed by the historians of Cumberland as a Barony. His possessions were of considerable extent, comprehending the two parishes of Mel- merby and Kirkland, in the former of which Culgarth was situated, and Ainstable, separated by a wide tract of country from the others. The whole are locally situated in the Forest of Cumberland, and may be more properly considered as a number of detached manors belonging to one proprietor, than as a barony. Adam Fitz-Sueine was living in the 5th of Henry II. He had two daughters, Mabel, married to Jeffrey de Neville, the son of Allan de Neville, who held Forest Pleas in Cumberland in the 13th of Henry II., and Matilda, the wife of Adam de Monbegon. In the 5th of Jchn, William de Neville, the son of Jeffrey was  excused his contribution to the Scutage, and Roger de Monbegon paid 20s. for his moiety of Culchet (Culgarth). When the Inquisitions in the "Testa de Neville" were taken, Roger de Monbegon was still living, and William de Neville's moiety was enjoyed by Simon Fitz-Walter and Alexander de Neville.


 


It is demonstrated  that Domesday Book provides an inadequate record of mesne tenancies in existence in 1086 but it is not certain whether the erratic recording of these was related to whether such tenancies were held in thegnage or by knight service or whether the inconsistency with which they were recorded may have been due to local variations in the manner in which the survey was compiled. Some of the mesne tenancies recorded in Domesday Book in 1086 can be shown not to have been held by knight service. In that year Alric, a thegn who survived the conquest, held mesne tenancies in the vills of Denby, South Hiendley and Whitley. In 1166 eight fees in the honour of Pontefract were returned as held by William de Neville, the husband of Amabel, daughter of Adam son of Sveinn son of Alric. These eight fees were of the new feoffment and therefore created after 1135 since 80 years previously Alric had held land which came to form part of these eight fees, it would appear that Alric [ Aluric ]and his son Sveinn (d.1129) continued to hold their land in thegnage but that, before his death in 1159, Adam, son of Sveinn must have had the mode of his tenure converted to knight service.
 



“Of fees of the new feoffment the eight knights’ fees which had belonged to Adam son of Sveinn, which in 1166 were in the tenure of William de Neville, his son-in-law, appear to have been assessed at the rate of 12 carucates making a knights fee, an equation specified in three charters of late 12th and early 13th century date.” Note: A carucate was in theory the area that a single eight ox plough-team could plough in a single year. It has been suggested that a Bovate in Yorkshire was probably between 8 and 15 acres but could be as low as 4 or as many as 28.
 In 1166 Denby was held by Adam de Montbegan, husband of Maud, Sveinn’s grand-daughter......
suggested that Thomas and Margaret’s holdings were descended from William de Neville and Adam de Montbegan the immediate heirs by marriage of Adam son of Sveinn........ The descent of the mesne of Dalton can be traced back to the pre conquest period as in 1086 it was held by Sveinn, Adam’s father and in 1066 by Alric, .

 

Besides his holdings of the honour of Richmond, Philip de Burgh held in 1166 ... son of Philip de Burgh son of Thomas de Bourgh was the first husband of Sara, a daughter of Amabel. So who was Sara's second husband?
 

Just to make things more confusing there is the item below in which we find that Amabel has been entered as Mabel and married to Jeffrey Neville as opposed to William, and that William was the son of Jeffrey!  Plus Maud is named as Matilda!

 

Adam de Montbegon gave to Geoffrey de Valoines 6 car. of land in Farleton and Cantsfield, to hold by military service. This estate was a member of Hornby, which had belonged (temp. Henry I.) to Swain fitz Alric (who died before 31 Hen. I.), and to his son, Adam fitz Swain (1130–1159), one of whose daughters, Matilda, brought Hornby in marriage to Adam de Montbegon. From: 'Lancashire Fines: 1-12 John', Final Concords for Lancashire, Part 1: 1189-1307 (1899), pp. 7-38. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=52530

 

Culgarth was granted to Adam Fitz-Sueine, and is classed by the historians of Cumberland as a Barony. His possessions were of considerable extent, comprehending the two parishes of Melmerby and Kirkland, in the former of which Culgarth was situated, and Ainstable, separated by a wide tract of country from the others. The whole are locally situated in the Forest of Cumberland, and may be more properly considered as a number of detached manors belonging to one proprietor, than as a barony.
Adam Fitz-Sueine was living in the 5th of Henry II. He had two daughters, Mabel, married to Jeffrey de Neville, the son of
Allan de Neville, who held Forest Pleas in Cumberland in the 13th of Henry II., and Matilda, the wife of Adam de Monbegon. In the 5th of Jchn, William de Neville, the son of Jeffrey was  excused his contribution to the Scutage, and Roger de Monbegon paid 20s. for his moiety of Culchet (Culgarth). When the Inquisitions in the " Testa de Neville" were taken, Roger de
Monbegon was still living, and William de Neville's moiety was enjoyed by Simon Fitz-Walter and Alexander de Neville.
 

Whereas:

Adam fitz Swain founded the Priory of Monk-Bretton, and died before 1159 (Pipe Roll, 5 Henry II.), leaving two daughters, (1) Amabel, the eldest, who married firstly Alexander de Crevequeur, and secondly William de Nevill, and had her purparty in cos. Cumberland, and Yorkshire, and a moiety of Croston cum membris, in co. Lanc., and (2) Matilda, who married Adam de Montbegon, a military tenant of the Honour of Lancaster in cos. Lincoln, Lancaster and Suffolk, to whom she brought her purparty of the estates in Cumberland and Yorkshire, the Manor and Castle of Hornby, and the other moiety of Croston cum membris, in co. Lancaster.
Adam de Montbegon died before 1 Richard I., leaving issue Roger, his son and heir; Clemence, wife of Sir Eudo de Longvilers; Mabel, wife of Geoffrey de Nevill; and Alice, wife of Esward, or Efward de Bury.

From: 'Lancashire Fines: 12-19 Henry III', Final Concords for Lancashire, Part 1: 1189-1307 (1899), pp. 54-74. URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.asp?compid=52533&strquery=Adam%20De%20Fitz%20Swain


 

Which leaves us with quite a problem concerning who was in actual residence at Thrybergh, how did Thrybergh fall into the hands of the Heatons, and who was Avica?

 

Well the answer seems to lay here:

There were several Heaton's who achieved knighthood in the early beginning of Heraldry in the period of 1150. The earliest recorded Heaton with an important knighthood was Sir Henry de Heton in 1180, and Sir Richard de Heton in Yorkshire in 1200. We can trace Richard's ancestry with confidence to a man named Alric who lived in Lancashire in 1100. He had a son named Adam who died in 1159. Adam had a daughter named Amabel who died in 1207. She married very well twice to the famous de Neville families. http://www.jimsweb.org/heaton/heathist.htm

 

At some stage the main tenants of Thrybergh still under De Perci fell to the Hetons who then sublet the tenancy.

 

Avica  was the next one to inherit Thrybergh, and when she married Ralph De Normanville the estate then fell to the Normanvilles.

 

The above people owned a vast number of estates throughout the land, and it is noticeable in the ownership of Thrybergh that often the ownership passed hands via female inheritance rather than male linage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Helpful pages regarding old terms and Latin

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